209.08 - A Quick look into the first discoveries of TESS

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Jan 8th at 11:10 AM until 11:20 AM

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Author(s): X. Huang, J. Burt, M. Gunther, A. Shporer, J. Dittmann, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, UNITED STATES|A. Vanderburg, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, Austin, Texas, UNITED STATES|J. Winn, Department of Astrophysical sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, UNITED STATES|
Institution(s): 1. Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States. 2. Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, Austin, TX, United States. 3. Department of Astrophysical sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, United States.
Contributing team(s): TESS collaboration
The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite promises to discover small planets around the nearest and brightest stars. After two months of observations, the TESS mission has recovered a few hundred planetary candidates. In this talk, we present an early look into the TESS data and one of the first discoveries from the TESS mission - the detection of a transiting planet around PI Mensae. The solar-type host star is unusually bright (V=5.7) and was already known to host a Jovian planet in a highly eccentric, 5.7-year orbit. The newly discovered planet has a radius about twice that of Earth and an orbital period of 6.27 days. Using archived radial velocity data, we determined the planet's mass to be about 4.8 ME. Using PI Mensae c as an example, I will review the process of planetary candidate identification in TESS Full Frame Images using the MIT Quick Look Pipeline.