Rick Hull

Location

Copacabana A

Rating ( vote)

If we are to believe the technology hype cycle, we are entering a new era of “cognitive computing", enabled by dramatic advances in natural language processing (NLP) , machine learning, and artificial intelligence more broadly. These advances, combined with evolutionary progress over recent years in areas such as knowledge representation and extraction, automated planning, software-as-a-service, user experience technologies, and crowd-sourcing, have the potential to transform many industries. How will these technologies impact Business Processes (BPs), and more broadly, the entire ecosystem that surrounds BPs in enterprise environments?

This technology shift leads us to re-imagine the traditional notion of a process in both front- and back-office scenarios, opening a new family of opportunities for transforming the BP ecosystem, and indeed, the very ways that business operations are conducted. We need to rethink how processes are defined, learned, enabled, enacted and automated, and we can challenge the traditional design-deploy-monitor-improve cycle of BPM. The talk will focus on two primary areas of transformation. First, the very shape of “Knowledge-intensive Processes (KiP's)" will transform because of both (a) automated capabilities to ingest, absorb, reason about and apply vast amounts of human knowledge currently locked into text (and other) kinds of documents, and (b) new styles of human-human and human-machine collaborations that take into account goals, actor intentions, and the knowledge that is being worked on. Second, cognitive computing will enable a new generation of capabilities for automatic learning and enactment of a broad variety of BPs. These range from (i) back-office support processes that are still highly manual, to (ii) project-management-intensive processes and KiPs (often conducted through conversations among people), and finally to (iii) highly open-ended activities that are supporting strategic, design- and decision-centric processes. There are early initiatives in both academia and industry to develop abstractions, approaches and systems that embody aspects of the transformation enabled by always-on cognitive computing. But a fundamental understanding of this shift will require a new research framing of the business process ecosystem.If we are to believe the technology hype cycle, we are entering a new era of “cognitive computing", enabled by dramatic advances in natural language processing (NLP) , machine learning, and artificial intelligence more broadly.These advances, combined with evolutionary progress over recent years in areas such as knowledge representation and extraction, automated planning, software-as-a-service, user experience technologies, and crowd-sourcing, have the potential to transform many industries.How will these technologies impact Business Processes (BPs), and more broadly, the entire ecosystem that surrounds BPs in enterprise environments?

This technology shift leads us to re-imagine the traditional notion of a process in both front- and back-office scenarios, opening a new family of opportunities for transforming the BP ecosystem, and indeed, the very ways that business operations are conducted.We need to rethink how processes are defined, learned, enabled, enacted and automated, and we can challenge the traditional design-deploy-monitor-improve cycle of BPM.The talk will focus on two primary areas of transformation.First, the very shape of “Knowledge-intensive Processes (KiP's)" will transform because of both (a) automated capabilities to ingest, absorb, reason about and apply vast amounts of human knowledge currently locked into text (and other) kinds of documents, and (b) new styles of human-human and human-machine collaborations that take into account goals, actor intentions, and the knowledge that is being worked on.Second, cognitive computing will enable a new generation of capabilities for automatic learning and enactment of a broad variety of BPs. These range from (i) back-office support processes that are still highly manual, to (ii) project-management-intensive processes and KiPs (often conducted through conversations among people), and finally to (iii) highly open-ended activities that are supporting strategic, design- and decision-centric processes. There are early initiatives in both academia and industry to develop abstractions, approaches and systems that embody aspects of the transformation enabled by always-on cognitive computing. But a fundamental understanding of this shift will require a new research framing of the business process ecosystem.