Minority students’ online learning readiness

Date & Time

Aug 5th at 2:45 PM until 3:30 PM

Track

Research To Practice 
Research 

Location

Rating ( votes)

This mixed methods study explored racial or ethnic minority students who were enrolled in an online course to determine if there was a relationship between their online learning readiness characteristics and their outcomes across institutions. Also, minority student perceptions of what skills and experiences lead to success and how they can be better supported for online online learning is reported. Student surveys were administered using Likert and open-ended items to gather quantitative and qualitative data. Readiness characteristics included student reporting of their technology access, beliefs, and skills (technology access, online work skills, social technology skills, online efficacy), their self-efficacy (self-directedness and organization, achievement mindset, and growth mindset), and their communication (need for socialization, general communication competence, communication with instructor, and communication with peers), and student outcomes gathered included student perceptions of learning, self-reported satisfaction, and academic performance (course grade, instructor reported). Significant findings were discovered from multiple regression analyses indicating that several of these measures of readiness (online work skills, online efficacy, self-directedness and organization, communication with instructor, communication with classmates) positively influence student outcomes (learning, satisfaction, and academic performance). Qualitative findings indicate that minority students report time management, previous online course experience, and online work skills as the most prevalent themes of skills and experiences that positively influence their success. Moreover, they recommend that instructors and institutions provide them additional resources prior to the class to better prepare them to be successful, and that they receive support during the class by instructors and academic support staff. Recommendations are shared.